Publication: Prenatal famine exposure has sex-specific effects on brain size

Published on 26/07/2016

A new study, focused on the Dutch famine of 1944-45, has highlighted how prenatal famine exposure has sex-specific effects on brain size.

Researchers from the University of Amsterdam and Jena University Hospital, Germany, studied prenatal exposure during the five-month Dutch famine that took place in the densely populated Western provinces, towards the end of the Second World War. The study has highlighted how men, but not women, who were exposed to famine in early gestation have smaller brain volumes than unexposed controlled participants at the age of 68 years.

The paper 'Prenatal famine exposure has sex-specific effects on brain size' was published in July 2016 in Brain, Volume 139, Issue 8, p2136-2142. The paper was published for the EU-funded BRAINAGE project, but the DynaHEALTH project is also using this cohort data. The paper's lead author, Tessa J. Roseboom, is also a member of the DynaHEALTH consortium.

To read the abstract or view the full paper visit the publisher's website.

 

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